PLEASE SUPPORT OUR ANNUAL APPEAL - CLICK TO DONATE
Ontario Residents’ Bill of Rights – Aphasia Institute
Program Registration - Members are being invited to sign up for Programs for January 2023

Ontario Residents’ Bill of Rights

$0.00

This pictographic version of the Ontario Residents’ Bill of Rights poster was designed by the Aphasia Institute and funded by the Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care, through the Seniors Health Research Transfer Network (SHRTN).

This important poster was created to help ensure that all residents of long-term care homes in the province of Ontario know and understand their rights.

The poster itself is free of charge to download for all long-term care homes in the province of Ontario.

In 2006, after several dramatic reports of abuse of residents in long-term care who were unable to report what had happened to them, a pictographic version of a Resident’s Bill of Rights poster was developed by the Aphasia Institute. This version gives patients with a communication problem or language barrier access to the information if they can’t understand it in written text format.

The use of specially designed pictographs to facilitate healthcare conversations is part of an evidence-based methodology called Supported Conversation for Adults with Aphasia (SCA™) developed at the Aphasia Institute.  SCA™ is a set of techniques that ensures that people who “know more than they can say” can accurately exchange information, opinions and feelings, and feel that their inherent competence is acknowledged. 

 

This pictographic version of the Ontario Residents’ Bill of Rights poster was designed by the Aphasia Institute and funded by the Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care, through the Seniors Health Research Transfer Network (SHRTN).

 

The poster itself is free of charge to download for all long-term care homes in the province of Ontario.

language

,

"Volunteering at the Aphasia Institute has been an amazing experience. It’s such a great feeling to help someone express themselves, or help someone understand another’s message. It can be challenging sometimes, but that just makes the moment a connection goes through that much more special. More than anything, I really appreciate the strong sense of community that the Aphasia Institute creates and being a part of that community."
- Vidya David, Volunteer
Scroll to Top